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Garden

Our property is in Kumbia in the South Burnett region of Queensland Australia.  The climate is sub-tropical, we get hot summers, which can be very dry or very wet.  We have cold winters and can have frost at times.  As we are relatively close to the equator, day length does not change much - in Summer it gets light around 5am and dark at 630pm, in Winter its more like 6am and 530pm respectively.

I'm still learning what grows well here and a lot of things have been a bit backwards, for example, Winter is the season for strawberries!  Here's a bit of info about about climate:

Is it winter yet? Cold weather preps
Surviving the QLD Heat Wave(s)
Growing food in the sub-tropics - the vege garden
Winter vegetable gardening in the sub-tropics
Frost preparations
Summer harvest, Winter planting





This is what I've learnt so far:
  • Spring - warm days and cool nights, minimal pests, so a good time to get plants established
    • Harvest silverbeet, mustard greens, spring onions and broccoli, herbs start regrowing
    • Start planting seeds and seedlings for summer!
  • Summer - hot and humid, slugs and powdery mildew are a problem, but if plants get established in Spring and are nice and strong they can survive and produce well
    • Tomatoes, zucchinis, squash, silverbeet, corn, eggplant, beans, capsicum
  • Autumn - still warm, but nights cooling off again, time to prepare for winter frosts and bring in the last of the summer harvest, time to plant winter crops including:
    • peas, brasicas and root crops
  • Winter - expect heavy frosts, nothing tender will survive to be eaten, put effort into silverbeet, brasicas and root crops, watch out for bandicoots!



I do try to follow organic principles where possible and my two best allies for adding fertility are mulch and compost/weed teas.  More on compost here.  And I have a worm farm.

Some other garden posts that you may find useful:

Hydroponics basics


Some fabulous gardening books that I refer to frequently (Thank you for supporting my blog by using my Amazon affiliate links)


     




Book reviews:


A Postage Stamp Garden - book review
The history of heirloom vegetables
A garden book and a cook book that I think you'll ...




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** Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about my garden, soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....

Cooking chokos (not be confused with another post about cooking chooks) has been the subject of a few questions on my blog lately, so here's some more information for you.
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Sign up for my weekly email updates here, you will find out more about soap and our farmlife, straight to your inbox, never miss a post!  New soap website and shop opening soon....
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